RP: United States coronavirus crisis and environmental crisis

 

This 12 April 2020 video from the USA says about itself: The people who are most likely to get seriously sick from COVID-19 are those who have long suffered from the impacts of pollution and climate injustice in America — here’s why. In US news and current events today, people who are most likely to […]

via United States coronavirus crisis and environmental crisis — Dear Kitty. Some blog

’27 Strange Icelandic Idioms and Phrases’

I found this amazing piece on Icelandic idioms and phrases posted by The Voyaging Viking. Here were my favorites:

Blind is a Bookless Man

Blindur er Bóklaus Maður

“Icelandic people read the most books in the world per capita. Reading is a huge part of the culture, and therefore this saying exists.”

You are such a Latte-drinking wool scarf

Þú ert nú meiri lattelepjandi lopatrefillinn

“Degrading term to someone that lives in Reykjavik.”

An absolute butt

Algjört rassgat

“If a baby, puppy, kitten, or something very cute then you would call it an absolute butt.”

Read the full article here!

TEDxReykjavik: My burnout success story – change your thoughts to change your life – Tanit Karolys

TEDx Talks “In her talk Tanit Karolys discusses her own burnout story, and how cold therapy and the power of the mind helped her to overcome it. Tanit Karolys is a transformational coach and co-founder of ANDRI ICELAND. She specializes in ancient techniques for self-improvement, mental and emotional healing as well as physical health. Tanit comes from a long corporate background where her own burnout experience led her to understand the importance of a balanced life and strong connection to our own inner abilities. She blends Cold Therapy, the power of the mind, ancient techniques and physical therapy in her work.”

The wonder women of ornithology

Writing by Dr Jo Wimpenny

“One of the most influential amateur ornithologists of all time, Margaret Morse Nice pioneered a new form of ornithology in the USA, uniting bird-banding techniques with new behavioural theories emerging from Europe, and her own background in child psychology.

Despite abandoning the prospect of a PhD to accompany her husband to Ohio and raise a family, Nice went on to publish three landmark monographs on the life history of the song sparrow, based on 14 years of data on the lives of ‘her’ backyard sparrows. The American Ornithologists’ Union recognised her work by awarding her the coveted Brewster Medal.

Nice corresponded with hundreds of people and played a central role in promoting the exchange of scientific information between US and European ornithologists. She published 250 research articles (seven of which were book length) and, as editor of Bird-Banding, a staggering 3,313 book and article reviews.”

“While others observed living birds, Annie Meinertzhagen was a skilled collector, who shot and skinned most of her birds herself. She was particularly interested in plumage and moulting of ducks and waders, and chick mouthpart colouration. For her expert knowledge, Henry Witherby invited her to author the relevant sections of his highly influential Handbook of British Birds, a work that became the standard authority on British birds for over a decade.

Indeed, to prevent publication delays, on marrying ornithologist Richard Meinertzhagen, she chose to spend part of her honeymoon studying birds at Lord Rothschild’s Museum in Tring. Her husband’s work was recently found to be largely fraudulent, and his role in her death – considered a tragic shooting accident at the time – remains suspicious.”

Read the full Discover Wildlife Article here

Documenting Tragedy: The Ethics of Photojournalism (NPR)

One of the main subjects I’ve been stuck on with my decision to move forward with documenting native cultures around the world is the question of ethics and how to approach these subjects without causing any feelings of invasion of personal/sacred space or exploitation. Here’s a helpful piece I found published by NPR on the ethics of documenting tragedies, which approaches a similar process.

 

https://www.npr.org/2012/12/06/166666261/documenting-tragedy-the-ethics-of-photojournalism